Four Paws Declawed-Dumped In A Ditch-Severe Arthritis In Paws-Walking Is Painful

 

Bernie was adopted recently after he was found in a ditch. Jill took him to the vet and had x-rays done of his paws to see why he cannot walk properly, why every step he takes he is in pain. The x-rays show severe arthritis in Bernie’s paws, which is common among declawed cats, and gets worse when they ge older. His hips are so sore he lays down like a dog with hip dysplasia. Notice in the photo’s his flat paws, this is called pamagrade stance-abnormal standing posture. The x-rays show the p3 bones missing and the p2 bones are curled with arthritis.

Declawing is animal abuse, there is no excuse for veterinarians to perform this life long pain filled barbaric procedure. A pet is supposed to go to a veterinarian to be healed, not mutilated.

Thank you Jill for saving Bernie, who otherwise would have probably died alone, knowing he was mutilated for profits by hands that took an oath to heal and knowing he was dumped by someone who did not want him anymore because they realized he was handicapped and did not want to face their guilt for what they did to him.

“A 1994 study by the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences at Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine found that of 163 cats who were declawed, 50 percent had one or more complications immediately after surgery, such as pain, hemorrhage, lameness, swelling, and non-weight bearing. Of the 121 cats whose progress was followed after surgery, 20 percent had continued complications, such as infection, regrowth, bone protrusion into the pad of the paw and prolonged intermittent lameness and palmagrade stance (abnormal standing posture).

“Scratching is a natural feline behavior that meets cat’s many needs. That’s why declawing has long-lasting effects on cats. Once their claws have been removed, they can no longer perform their natural stretching and kneading rituals. They become weaker as they age and may experience debilitating arthritis in their backs and shoulders.

 

 

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Declawing Is Animal Abuse-AVMA Still Has Not Published The JFMS Study-Pain And Adverse Behavior In Declawed Cats/May/2017

 

Question on Quora-Which is kinder to a cat: leave it in a shelter or have it declawed so we can adopt it?

John Dasef, Have served many feline overlords.
Answered Jan 2
Original question: We want to adopt a cat from a shelter, but our apartment requires all cats be declawed. We oppose declawing, but can’t move now. Is it kinder to declaw the cat or leave it in the shelter?

Good for you for being against declawing. It is never kinder to declaw a cat just to satisfy some landlord’s wretched policy.

I agree with the other answers here – wait until you can find a cat that has already been declawed, with the understanding that because it is declawed, it may have issues that a normal cat wouldn’t usually have, such as possibly being a biter, having problems using a litter box, and potentially other medical problems like osteoarthritis as it grows older.

My nephew is a veterinarian who specializes in cats both large and small – he’s the senior vet at a large municipal zoo. When I asked him his opinion on declawing, he wrote me a detailed answer on why it’s such a barbaric practice and gave me permission to publish it any time and anywhere I thought it might help. It’s a long answer, but I hope you will read it, it will help you understand the problems you may face with a declawed cat. This is what he wrote:

“First, let us reflect on the fact that the US is one of the few remaining modern countries that still allows this practice. It has actually been outlawed in most other countries, because of the physical and psychological effects it has on the animal. In Canada, most European countries, and Australia, you would actually lose your license to practice vet medicine if you were to perform this surgery, where it is uniformly viewed as unethical and inhumane.

Where does this perception come from, you ask? let us delve into that. First, most vets do not take the time to go into detail about what is actually involved when people declaw their cats. Most people simply believe you remove only the claws, no big deal. The reality is, you are performing an amputation of each digit, akin to amputating each finger and toe at the 3rd joint. this means, (as if simply pulling off the finger and toe nails would not be painful enough) is that this is a true bone amputation removing the bone that the claw is attached to. why this may not seem significant, we need to remember that cats claws are retractable, and that they bear their weight on the end of that second digit, where we are performing the amputation. This is important, because the retractable claws means you actually have digital flexor and extensor tendons that attach to the terminal bone which is amputated. The flexor tendon is of critical importance in all of this, as it is attached to the digital pad on the bottom of the toe.

This pad provides cushion when the animal places weight on the toe as it walks. when you amputate the terminal bone, known as P3, the severing on that tendon causes it to pull back, much like a rubber band that is stretched, and then cut. the tendon also shifts the position of that digital pad it is attached to, pulling it back as well. this often means it is not in position to provide the cushioning it is intended to as the cat places its weight on that P2 bone. (imagine the difference between walking on sharp stones barefoot, as opposed to having sandals, or even flip flops to cushion). in other words, there is now an increased level of pain in each step the cat takes. The only way the body knows to try to resolve this is to create more bone. this leads to arthritis in the toes. So what happens when you have arthritis? you compensate in how you move, right? which, guess what? puts unnatural pressure on the joints you are compensating with, which means you are more likely to develop osteoarthritis in those joints as well, which is exactly what we see happen with cats. Declawed cats have an increased incidence of degenerative joint disease (DJD) in the elbows and hips. Why isn’t this noted more, you ask? Because cats are (pardon my language here) fucking studs when it comes to pain! the behavioral adaptations to the condition often has to be pointed out to people, because cats simply will not show they are in pain, until they are in so much pain they simply cannot avoid showing it. this comes from their life as an apex predator in the wild, where showing pain means you lose your territory, or your place in the pride.The signs are usually very subtle, but once you know to look for them, they become obvious.

The cat that used to jump to the top of the counter in one bound, now jumps to the stool first, then to the counter top. The incidence of cats with DJD is way under diagnosed, due to the fact cats simply don’t show pain. The level of pain they deal with would have a human wheelchair bound, I might add. (humans, for the most part, are sissies when it comes to pain tolerance). There have also been cases of pieces of the amputated bone being left in the surgical site, or the end of the P2 bone being shattered or fractured during the process of the surgery, when done with a pair of nail trimmers, as is common.. This again results in long term pain, and bone changes leading to arthritis. Imagine living for years with that rock you can’t get out of your shoe, except now you also never get to take your shoe off. There have been cases where the end of the bone is not fully removed, and you have the nail try to grow back, often in horrific fashion. (you can do a google search and come up with some intense pictures of this process). There have also been cases of cats, due to the malpositioning of the digital pad I mentioned earlier, literally walking through the skin on the end of their toes, resulting in them literally walking on the exposed bone of their toes..

So, if their are so many reasons not to declaw cats, why is the US one of the last countries where it is still accepted practice to do so? There are several reasons, none of them a good reason to continue the practice.

1) vets are simply too lazy to try to educate their clients on the effects of declawing, and it is an easy surgery, that they make fairly good profit on.

2)they feel as though they will lose the client to another vet if they do not perform the surgery. “if I don’t do it, the other guy will.”

3) they use the excuse that it may lead to the cat being turned out or worse, euthanized if they do not do the surgery, because the cat may damage furniture. there are several issues with this most useless of excuses. first, wouldn’t they be the one to have to euthanize the cat? everyone I ever worked for knew very well I refused to ever do a “convenience euthanasia” in other words, the animal had to have a medical condition, or was uncontrollably aggressive, in order for me to euthanize it. Follow your own ethics, and this excuse goes away. secondly, you can “teach” the owners to control the cats behavior. use cat trees, perform proper nail trimming, use soft paws…..”

Go ahead and re-print this if you like, then give it to your landlord or apartment manager the day you move out. Best of luck…

LINK TO ORIGIONAL

Declawed Mr. Louis Has Joint Swelling And His Toe Tendons Are Starting To Freeze

 

This is the lovable and cuddly Mr. Louis. He was recently adopted, as an already declawed cat, by a family that is very attentive to his needs. He has not displayed any behavior abnormalities however he walks like “a women in wobbly stilettos” so was taken to Dr. Nicole Martell-Moran at the Feline Medical Center in Houston for an evaluation.
No bone fragments were found on the X-rays however he cannot fully extend one wrist due to joint swelling and the tendons that move his toes are starting to contract or freeze. He walks with a less than normal balance as if walking on egg shells. With continued monitoring, joint supplements and pain management when needed he should do well in his new home.
Wish this handsome boy luck in his new home and a big thank you to his new family! Continue to educate about how declawing affects cats for the rest of their lives.

PAW PROJECT LINK TO ORIGINAL

 

No More Declawing In Nova Scotia-New Law For The Safety Of Felines

Nova Scotia becomes first province to ban declawing of domestic cats
HALIFAX — Nova Scotia has become the first province to ban medically unnecessary cat declawing, part of a worldwide movement against the practice.

The Nova Scotia Veterinary Medical Association decided Tuesday to amend its code of ethics to make the practice of elective and non-therapeutic declawing ethically unacceptable.

It will come into effect on March 15, 2018, following a three-month education period.

Dr. Frank Richardson, registrar of the association, said the decision follows years of discussion by veterinarians, surveys, public input, and a recent statement from the national association.

The Canadian Veterinary Medical Association strengthened its stand against declawing domestic cats in March, saying the practice causes unnecessary and avoidable pain.

Vets’ groups in many other provinces are having active discussions on the issue, Richardson said: “It’s on everybody’s radar.”

Richardson said while declawing was popular 20 years ago, fewer and fewer veterinarians have been willing to perform the procedure.

“The number is getting smaller and smaller each year. I think if we did nothing it would die off on its own,” he said.

Dr. Hugh Chisholm, a retired veterinarian who has been pushing for the change, said while some municipalities have enacted regulations against declawing, Nova Scotia becomes the first province or state in North America to declare the practice unethical.

“It’s a great day. I’m so proud of the Nova Scotia Veterinary Medical Association,” said Chisholm, Atlantic Canada director for the Paw Project.

“You are amputating 10 bones from 10 digits on the paws of a cat, and if that doesn’t constitute mutilation, I don’t know what does,” he said.

The practice has already been banned in the U.K., Europe, Australia and several California cities. New Jersey is considering a law that would ban the practice unless a vet decides the operation is medically necessary.

“Now that we have this success in Nova Scotia, I will be contacting the other provincial veterinary associations to encourage them to do the same thing. I think it’s just a matter of time,” Chisholm said.

For years some pet owners have had their cats declawed to prevent scratches to furniture, people and other pets. But the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association says scratching is normal behaviour that cats use to mark territory, help with balance, climb and defend themselves.

Chisholm said there will still be cases where declawing will be medically necessary.

“Those would be very rare cases, but yes if it is in the cat’s best interest to have a claw removed or a few claws removed because of trauma or infection, then yes it is the right thing to do. To do it because you’re worried your sofa is going to get picked or scratched is just wrong,” Chisholm said.

— By Kevin Bissett in Fredericton.

The Canadian Press

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