Declawed Cats Correlate To ”Prisoners Of War” – Dr. Nicolas Dodman – Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists and Professor

Dr. Nicholas Dodman, author of “The Cat Who Cried for Help,” has this to say about declawing:”The inhumanity of the procedure is clearly demonstrated by the nature of cats’ recovery from anesthesia following the surgery. Unlike routine recoveries, including recovery from neutering surgeries, which are fairly peaceful, declawing surgery results in cats bouncing off the walls of the recovery cage because of excruciating pain. –Declawing fits the dictionary definition of mutilation to a tee. Words such as deform, disfigure, disjoint, and dismember all apply to this surgery. Partial digital amputation is so horrible that it has been employed for torture of prisoners of war, and in veterinary medicine, the clinical procedure serves as model of severe pain for testing the efficacy of analgesic drugs. Even though analgesic drugs can be used postoperatively, they rarely are, and their effects are incomplete and transient anyway, so sooner or later the pain will emerge.”

DR. DODMAN’S BOOK ON AMAZON
The Cat Who Cried for Help: Attitudes, Emotions, and the Psychology of Cats Hardcover – September 2, 1997
by Nicholas Dodman (Author)

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SUMMARY

In this groundbreaking book, Dr. Nicholas Dodman does for feline psychology what he did for canines in his widely acclaimed The Dog Who Loved Too Much. Here he reveals the fascinating, and often frustrating, mind of one of our most popular–and certainly most independent–animal companions, and shows how we can coexist peacefully with even the stubbornest of cats.

What do you do about a cat determined to tear your sofa to shreds? Or one who gorges himself on your best running shoes . . . or attacks anyone who dares to open the refrigerator door? Drawing on remarkable real-life stories from his practice at the prestigious Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine, Dr. Dodman shares the unique, compassionate, dramatically successful treatment programs that have given problem cats a new lease on life . . . and their perplexed owners long-term solutions to even the most intractable disorders.

As any cat owner knows, changing a cat’s behavior can seem like an impossible task. But contrary to popular belief, cats can be trained and cured of irritating habits and undesirable behaviors. The Cat Who Cried for Help shows how minor adjustments in diet, exercise regimen, and environment can effect dramatic breakthroughs in resolving almost any feline problem. From cat panic attacks to eating disorders, from litterbox aversion to depression and a wide range of feline phobias, Dr. Dodman has successfully treated and resolved these and many other heretofore untreatable behaviors.

Inside, you’ll meet Ashley, the boss-cat who literally bites the hand that feeds him; Jonathan, the binge-eater; Rubles, the Abyssinian Jekyll and Hyde, pussycat one minute, man-eating tiger the next; and Thomas, the cat who cried for help–a little too loudly. Dr. Dodman’s techniques are based on the most up-to-date research in pharmacology and feline behaviorism. Yet the primary objective of his treatments is to respect and protect the qualities of independence and dignity fundamental to a cat’s nature.

Including descriptions of symptoms, treatment options, and tips on prevention, The Cat Who Cried for Help provides everything you need to know to ensure both you and your feline friend a long, happy, and healthy relationship. If you’ve ever wanted to better understand the nature of this mysterious, enigmatic, and fascinating creature, Dr. Dodman’s book provides a penetrating look into the intriguing and intricate world of the cat in your life.

Dr. Nicholas Dodman-Biography

Dr. Nicholas Dodman is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists, and Professor, Section Head and Program Director of the Animal Behavior Department of Clinical Sciences. Dr. Dodman is one of the world’s most noted and celebrated veterinary behaviorists. He grew-up in England and trained to be a vet in Scotland. At the age of 26, he became the youngest veterinary faculty member in Britain. It was at that time that Dr. Dodman began specializing in surgery and anesthesiology. In 1981, Dr. Dodman immigrated to the United States where he became a faculty member of Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine. Shortly after his arrival, Dr. Dodman became interested in behavioral pharmacology and the field of animal behavior. After spending several years in this area of research, he founded the Animal Behavior Clinic – one of the first of its kind – at Tufts in 1986. He received an additional board certification in animal behavior from the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists. Dr. Dodman began to see clinical cases in 1987 and since 1990, he has devoted all of his time to his specialty practice of animal behavior. Since the mid 1990s, Dr. Dodman has written four acclaimed bestselling books that have received a tremendous amount of national press. His first book, The Dog Who Loved Too Much (Bantam Books, 1995), was an unqualified success selling more than 100,000 copies as did his second book, The Cat Who Cried for Help (Bantam Books, 1997). His third book, Dogs Behaving Badly (Bantam Books, 1999) was again a bestseller while his latest, If Only They Could Speak (W.W. Norton & Co., 2002) was recently released as a trade paperback. Dr. Dodman is internationally recognized and sought after as a leader in his field.

In addition to his four trade books, he has authored two textbooks and more than 100 articles and contributions to scientific books and journals. He appears regularly on radio and television including: 20/20, Oprah, The Today Show, Good Morning America, Dateline, World News with Peter Jennings, Discovery Channel, NOVA, Animal Planet, the BBC and CBC, CNN’s Headline News, Inside Edition, MSNBC, NOVA, NPR’s “Fresh Air” and A&E. He is an ad hoc guest on WBUR’s “Here & Now.” As a former senior editor for PetPlace.com, he is currently a columnist for the American Kennel Club’s quarterly publication, AKC Family Dog, where his column was nominated for 2005 “Column of the Year.” Additionally, he is a Pet Expert for Time, Inc. and also writes a monthly “Expert Advice” column for LIFE magazine that is read by twelve million people. Dr. Dodman is also the editor of Tufts University’s forthcoming Puppies First Steps, which has been sold to Houghton Mifflin (2007). He is a consultant to and official national spokesman for a new line of pet products from Zero Odor LLC for whom he recently completed shooting a 28-minute infomercial that will air up to five times a week on cable television networks beginning the spring of 2006. In addition, Dr Dodman has recently completed a television pilot for a series of his own sponsored by The Humane Society of the United States. Dr. Dodman graduated from Glasgow University Veterinary School in Scotland where he received a BVMS (DVM equivalent). He was a surgical intern at the Glasgow Veterinary School before joining the faculty. He received a Diploma in Veterinary Anesthesia from the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, and is board certified by the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists and the American College of Veterinary Behaviorists. He is a member of the American Veterinary Medical Association, the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, and the American Society for Veterinary Animal Behavior. Dr. Dodman holds ten US patents for behavior modification treatments, including a recent (2002) patent that details a novel treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder in humans. Early work in the Harvard and Yale University Psychiatry Departments confirms the validity of this novel treatment. Dr. Dodman lives near Tufts University with his wife, Dr. Linda Breitman, a veterinarian who specializes in small animals, and their children.

Doctor Dodman’s Bio

You really shouldn’t declaw your cat. Do this instead.-Popular Science Website

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“Declawing” may sound like a relatively benign procedure, like getting your nails trimmed. But declawing a cat so she’ll stop scratching the furniture involves removing the bones at the tip of her toes. The process can result in long-term problems for your feline friend, a new study concludes.

Cats who’ve been declawed are more likely to have a difficult time walking—with the ends of their toes removed, they’re forced to walk on the soft cartilage that was previously a part of their joints. These cats are known to chew at the stubs of their paws, and may suffer from chronic pain. In addition, many owners find that their cats become more aggressive after the surgery.

To study the long-term consequences of declawing, researchers examined 274 cats of various ages, half of whom had been declawed. Studying animals in shelters and others who had been brought in for veterinary appointments, they examined the cats for signs of pain (which, in cats, manifests itself as potty problems, flinching in response to touch, body tension, and excessive licking or chewing of fur, among other things). They also looked at the cats’ medical histories and behavioral reports from their vets and owners.

Declawed cats were 7 times more likely to pee in inappropriate places.

They found that declawed cats were seven times more likely to pee in inappropriate places, four times more likely to bite people, three times more likely to be aggressive, and three times more likely to overgroom themselves. In addition, the declawed cats were three times more likely to be diagnosed with back pain (possibly because they had to modify their gait due to their missing toe bones) and/or chronic pain in their paws.

Declawed cats may be more likely to urinate on soft surfaces like carpets or clothing because it’s less painful than the gravel in the litterbox. Having no other way to defend themselves, they may resort to biting when in pain, and unfortunately for their humans, bite wounds from a cat may be more likely than scratches to cause infection and hospitalization.

The study would be stronger if the researchers had been able to study the cats before and after the declawing procedure, to work out for certain whether these negative effects were caused by the declawing procedure. However, those studies are more expensive and more difficult.

Lead author Nicole Martell-Moran is a Texas veterinarian and a director at the Paw Project, an organization whose goal is to end cat declawing.

“The result of this research reinforces my opinion that declawed cats with unwanted behaviors may not be ‘bad cats’,” she said in a statement, “they may simply need pain management. We now have scientific evidence that declawing is more detrimental to our feline patients than we originally thought and I hope this study becomes one of many that will lead veterinarians to reconsider declawing cats.”

Try training instead

Declawing is outlawed in many developed countries, but not the U.S. or Canada. However, many American veterinary associations are opposed to declawing, except as a last resort.

Before you resort to declawing your cat, try training her first. Yes indeed, cats can be trained! And it’s not as hard as it sounds. Here are some tips:

  1. Get at least one scratching post (or make your own!). If it’s a vertical scratching post, make sure it’s tall enough that your cat can stretch to use it. And make sure it’s stable.
  2. Position the post near your cat’s favorite sleeping spot, and/or near the furniture she likes to scratch the most.
  3. Cover the post in catnip or toys so that it’s more attractive than the sofa.
  4. Reward the cat with a cheek scritch or a treat every time she uses the post.
  5. Don’t hit her if she scratches the sofa. Just say ‘no’ firmly and relocate her to the appropriate scratching post, and reward her for using that instead.
  6. Talk to your vet if the problem persists.

POPULAR SCIENCE ARTICLE

Petco’s PetCoach-Answers To Declawing Questions-Horror Accounts Of Declawed Cats-Vet Declawed A Pregnant Cat-First Photo

As you can see by the last images Petco is not against declawing. Declawing is banned in 44 countries, several cities in the USA and when the bill is signed in New York it will be banned for the first time in a state in the USA. Most of Canada has banned declawing. Declawing benefits veterinarian$, NOT their clients. ALL declawed cats suffer, it is legal animal cruelty. See the studies done by ethical veterinarians in the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery. Ethical veterinarians want declawing banned nationwide, they encounter many declawed cats who need to be declawed again to remove bone pieces or claw regrowth.

 

Petco’s PetCoach Website

USA: Millions Of Cats Declawed-Declawing Is A Billion Dollar Industry

”The pro-declawing attitudes of many U.S. veterinarians, however, are somewhat understandable. There is too much profit to be made in the pet industry. Even a rather underestimated price of $100 per cat/declawing—a bargain, given the amount of pain and suffering that is caused to the animal–makes declawing a billion-dollar industry in the U.S. Many veterinarians naturally don’t want to miss out on those profits.”

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LINK TO ALEV DUDEK’S POST

ALEV DUDEK’S BIO

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