AVMA Formulates Policies With Their Members’ Best Interests In Mind-No Bans On Declawing-22 Million Cats Are Declawed Yearly In The USA

Why does the AVMA not support legislation to ban declawing? Because it is a billion dollar industry, that’s why. They refuse to publish the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Study-Peer Reviewed-Pain and Adverse Behavior In Declawed Cats-May 2017.

This Is The Study AVMA Refuses To Add To Their Journals

It is all about keeping their members’ interests in mind, which translates to -it is all about keeping money in their members’ pockets, instead of genuinely and humanely treating pets as they should be treated.

See This Link On How Deceptive AVMA Is

The declaw procedure takes about 20 minutes and costs anywhere from $200-$700, add it up.
22 Million Cats Are Declawed Yearly In The USA


Declawed Against Policy-Keaton Not Using Litter Box-Toe Joints Do Not Fully Extend-The Paw Project

The Paw Project shared The Paw Project – Texas’s post.
20 mins ·
This is Keaton from our friends at Second Chance Pets in League City, TX. He was adopted as a kitten with a no-declaw policy. Instead of returning him to their organization, as requested, they rehomed him to someone who declawed him. Afterward he started not using his litter box consistently and found himself back with the rescue organization, thankfully. Their astute staff knew he needed help so they took him to see Dr. Nicole Martell-Moran at the Feline Medical Center in Houston for a paw evaluation.
Keaton did not have bone fragments left behind from the surgery however his toe joints could no longer fully extend. This can cause chronic muscle pain and discomfort all the way up the limb to the elbows. He was given pain medication to try and is finally with people who understand his problem. Wish him luck on finding a new forever home! If you are interested in more information about this boy contact Second Chance Pets (http://www.secondchancepets.org/).




Some no-declaw vets may remain members of the AVMA and try to effect change from the inside. For other veterinarians, the AVMA’s position on declawing is intolerable. Here is a letter from one of them.
Jan 29, 2018
American Veterinary Medical Association
Dear Colleagues,
I am writing this letter to explain why I can no longer be a member of the AVMA….
It is time to take a stronger stand against the inhumane and cruel declawing of cats in the United States. As evidence of long-term consequences of an onychectomy becomes more widely known, many veterinarians are choosing not to declaw. However, I stand with Britain, Australia and most European nations who have outlawed declawing. I believe that the United States must join these nations and institute a nation-wide declawing ban.
The AVMA’s current position does not call for its members to eliminate this procedure nor does it state any plan to phase it out. This is unacceptable to me. As leaders and representatives of our profession, I implore you to take a strong stand against this cruel and unnecessary mutilation and begin the process to eliminate declawing in the United States.
Until such time the AVMA comes out strongly against declawing, I cannot in good conscience maintain membership.
Karel Carnohan, DVM

Ethical Veterinarians Do Not Declaw-Unethical Veterinarian$ Do Not Care About Your Cat


A More Accurate Name for Declawing: ‘De-toeing’
By Dr. Karen Shaw Becker

Declawing continues to be a hotly discussed topic in the U.S., and while there’s growing awareness of exactly what onychectomy involves (it’s not just a permanent nail trim but mutilation of a cat’s paws), kitties continue to be subjected to the procedure, and the debate rages on.

I recently learned of the of a Connecticut veterinarian that featured highly disturbing photos of a spiraled nail removed from a cat who had been declawed 12 years earlier. During the onychectomy, some nail tissue was inadvertently left behind, which isn’t all that unusual with declaw procedures.

In this case, the remaining tissue formed a new nail that couldn’t grow naturally, so it grew in a spiral inside the cat’s leg, embedded in the flesh. It wasn’t until the spiraled nail formed a mass the size of a ping pong ball and broke through the poor cat’s wrist, that anyone knew there was a problem.

This is an extreme case of what can happen after a declaw procedure, but it should cause everyone who cares about cats to rethink what we’re doing when we surgically “redesign” cats’ feet for the sake of human convenience.

Dr. Aubrey Lavizzo, a veterinarian and anti-declaw advocate practicing in Colorado has, like so many in our profession, performed onychectomies at the insistence of cat-owning clients. In an interview with the Denver Post, Lavizzo made the point that the procedure should really be called de-toeing, because it’s not a nail trim, it’s amputation of the cat’s toes.

feline digital amputation
Declawing removes the claw, bones, nerves, the joint capsule, collateral ligaments and the extensor or flexor tendons. Amputation of the third phalanx or the first toe bone that houses the nail drastically alters the conformation of the feet, which can lead to a host of physical complications such as chronic small bone arthritis, degenerative joint disease and neuralgia.

“As veterinarians, we take an oath that we will use our knowledge and skills to benefit society through the relief of pain in our animal clients,” says Lavizzo. “When you talk about pain in cats, it’s classified as mild, moderate and severe. Mild is a neuter. Moderate is a spay. And severe is a declaw.”1

Because the feline claw grows right out of the bone, during declawing, it’s common for veterinarians to miss a tiny piece of bone that subsequently grows back as a partial nail or bone fragment. The missed piece can continue to grow under the skin, pressing into tissue and nerves, or it can grow right through the skin.

Dr. Lavizzo studies declawed cats and keeps records of bone fragments and bone spurs left behind after declawing procedures. He believes the pain caused by those missed pieces of bone may result in behavior changes like biting and eliminating outside the litterbox.

“We always see the same thing, because it’s so hard to do this procedure perfectly,” Lavizzo told the Post. “You can’t predict a successful outcome, and if you can’t predict a successful outcome, then you shouldn’t do the procedure.”

It is estimated the vast majority (80 percent) of declawed cats have at least one complication resulting from the surgery, and over a third develop behavior problems afterward.

So Why Are Cats Still Being Declawed?

Cat owners who still favor declawing typically either don’t understand what the procedure actually does to a kitty’s feet, or are more concerned with being scratched or having their furniture or other belongings damaged than with the risks and pain involved in onychectomy. Many veterinarians who are still willing to perform declaws believe they’re doing it to save cats who would otherwise be relinquished to shelters.

The ASPCA and the Cat Fanciers Association oppose declawing. The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) takes the position that declawing should be considered only after attempts have been made to prevent the cat from using its claws destructively or when its clawing presents a zoonotic risk for its owner(s).

The AVMA has also published a literature review on the welfare implications of declawing on cats. It’s important to note that the U.S. is behind the curve when it comes to banning declaws. According to a recent article in Newsweek:

“In some cities and many countries, declawing is considered so inhumane that it is illegal. Article 10 of the European Convention for the Protection of Pet Animals bans declawing, along with defanging, docking ears and tails, and removing the vocal cords of a pet.

There are only a few exceptions to these rules; specifically, when a vet deems the procedures necessary to the animal’s well-being. The same goes for Australia, Brazil, San Francisco and, possibly in the near future, Denver.”2

My hope is that ultimately every state in America will ban declaws for humane reasons, and that all animal advocacy groups, in particular the AVMA, will come out in full opposition to the procedure.

Alternatives to Declawing

Cats are digitigrades, meaning they walk on their toes. Most other mammals, including humans, walk on the soles of their feet. Kitties use their claws for balance, exercise and stretching and toning the muscles of their legs, back, shoulders and paws. Cats who roam outdoors (which I don’t recommend) use their claws to hunt and capture prey, to escape or defend against predators, and as part of feline marking behavior.

At the risk of discouraging people from acquiring cats as pets, I suggest that if you absolutely can’t live with an animal companion who has sharp claws and scratches things with them, you might want to avoid getting a kitty. Alternatively, you can check with your local shelters and rescue groups for homeless cats that have already been declawed.

If you have or plan to adopt a kitty with claws, the humane solution to unwanted scratching is to provide sensible, appealing options for your cat. Felines have claws for a reason, and as long as they have them, they’ll use them. Just as most humans need to trim their nails weekly, it may be necessary to trim your cat’s nails weekly or at least every couple of weeks.

In addition to regular nail trims, I also recommend cat guardians provide at least two different scratching surfaces, including a tall, sturdy scratching post and a horizontal scratching mat. In addition to providing your kitty with appropriate surfaces to scratch, you must also take steps to protect any off-limits areas your cat is scratching.

Depending on what surfaces you want to protect, consider using one or a combination of kitty scratching deterrents, such as aluminum foil, double-sided tape, plastic sheeting, plastic carpet runners, car or chair mats with the spiky sides up, or inflated balloons.

There are also herbal sprays available that are designed to replace your pet’s paw pad scent markers on furniture or other surfaces with an odor that will discourage him from returning to that spot. You can also consider covering your cat’s nails with commercially available nail caps, which will help protect both you and your belongings from those sharp claws.

Now, there are some cats that no matter what you do, will continue to scratch forbidden surfaces and potentially damage your belongings. After all, one of the most fascinating things about having a cat around the house is you’re sharing your life with a creature that will never be entirely domesticated. Bottom line: Clawing and scratching goes with the territory when you’re a cat parent, and the solution should never, ever be to cut off your pet’s toes.


Four Paws Declawed-Dumped In A Ditch-Severe Arthritis In Paws-Walking Is Painful


Bernie was adopted recently after he was found in a ditch. Jill took him to the vet and had x-rays done of his paws to see why he cannot walk properly, why every step he takes he is in pain. The x-rays show severe arthritis in Bernie’s paws, which is common among declawed cats, and gets worse when they ge older. His hips are so sore he lays down like a dog with hip dysplasia. Notice in the photo’s his flat paws, this is called pamagrade stance-abnormal standing posture. The x-rays show the p3 bones missing and the p2 bones are curled with arthritis.

Declawing is animal abuse, there is no excuse for veterinarians to perform this life long pain filled barbaric procedure. A pet is supposed to go to a veterinarian to be healed, not mutilated.

Thank you Jill for saving Bernie, who otherwise would have probably died alone, knowing he was mutilated for profits by hands that took an oath to heal and knowing he was dumped by someone who did not want him anymore because they realized he was handicapped and did not want to face their guilt for what they did to him.

“A 1994 study by the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences at Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine found that of 163 cats who were declawed, 50 percent had one or more complications immediately after surgery, such as pain, hemorrhage, lameness, swelling, and non-weight bearing. Of the 121 cats whose progress was followed after surgery, 20 percent had continued complications, such as infection, regrowth, bone protrusion into the pad of the paw and prolonged intermittent lameness and palmagrade stance (abnormal standing posture).

“Scratching is a natural feline behavior that meets cat’s many needs. That’s why declawing has long-lasting effects on cats. Once their claws have been removed, they can no longer perform their natural stretching and kneading rituals. They become weaker as they age and may experience debilitating arthritis in their backs and shoulders.